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Texas Criminal and Traffic Leads and Direct Mail

If you are looking for specific information on Texas Class C misdemeanor traffic leads and direct mail, please click here

The leads: We collect Texas criminal and traffic leads from the following counties. If you see a county below, we collect leads for criminal and traffic cases for that county. And if you don't see a county below, we don't collect leads for it at the moment, but that may change, so feel free to check back in the future.

Bexar Brazoria Collin Comal
Dallas Denton Ellis Galveston
Gregg Harris Lubbock Midland
Montgomery Rockwall Tarrant Taylor
Travis      

Where do you collect the leads from? It depends on the county. In some counties we collect it from the clerk of court. In other counties, we collect it from the jail/sheriff's office. 

Types of service: We have two types of service: the Traditional Service and the Full Service. With the Traditional Service, we collect leads on newly filed Texas criminal and traffic cases. We filter these leads according to your specifications in terms of the counties you are interested in, the types of charges (cases) you are interested in, and your general marketing strategy. We can then send you a spreadsheet containing these leads. You only pay for the leads we send you and we only send you the leads that you want. In addition, we also offer a free mail merge service. If you email us your letters, we will keep them on file, and then each day, Monday through Friday, we will mail merge the leads into your letters and then email you the already mail-merged letters ready for printing. If you plan to use labels to address your mail pieces, you can email us the brand and number of labels you use, and we can set up free, daily mail merge into your labels.

For the Full Service, we handle the entire process for you, from collecting the newly filed Texas criminal and traffic cases (the leads), filtering them to your specifications in terms of counties, types of charges that you are interested in, and any other strategy that you have. We then print your envelopes and letters in full color and mail off your mail pieces (advertisements). We mail each day, Monday through Friday. We are professional mailers and maintain multiple permits with USPS.

Pricing: The pricing is county dependent and volume dependent. Each county in Texas works slightly differently in terms of how easy and how costly it is for us to get the raw data that we transform into the leads. The volume of leads or mail pieces can impact the prices as well, with higher volumes generally associated with a lower per lead or per mail piece cost. 

Please call us at 919-349-9288 or email us at info@directlegalmail.com and we can talk about what you are looking for and we can provide you with a custom quote. If you have several strategies that you want to price out, we can assist you with that. We can run the volume numbers and give you average cost figures for the different strategies you have in mind. 

How fresh are the Texas leads? We collect the Texas leads each day, every day, so the leads are as fresh as the leads can be. We email the leads to you each day, Monday through Friday. Monday's data contains the leads from the weekend.

Can I get only the types of cases I want and only in the counties that I want? Yes. We can filter the data to your specifications according to county and type of offense/charge.

Is it easy to make changes? Yes, just email us and we can make the changes for you.

Any other special characteristics of your service: Yes, we can provide free mail merge to make things easier on your end. Basically, you email us your letters and we keep them on file. Each day, we mail merge the data into the letters, and then email you the already mail-merged letters along with the data. You can just open up the document containing the mail-merged letters and just hit “print.” Then you can do the rest of the mailing process. It is that easy. There is no extra charge for mail merge.

Can you do the mailings for me? Yes. This is called our Full Service. We are able to collect the leads, filter them to your specifications, and do the mailings for you. We are professional mailers who have permits with the Post Office. We do the mailings each day, Monday through Friday, so that your potential clients promptly receive your direct mail advertisements. Please call us at 919-349-9288 or email us at info@directlegalmail.com so we can discuss your needs/requirements. We can also provide you with a custom quote. 

Do you have any samples of the Texas leads or advertisement letters for me to look at? Yes, please email us at info@directlegalmail.com or use the contact box to the right, and we will send you a sample of the data and/or sample letters.

 

Application Form and Texas Rules 7.05 and 7.07 – Direct Mail Advertising

Application Form – Lawyer Advertising and Solicitation Communications

 

7.05 Prohibited Written, Electronic, or Digital Solicitations

(1) the communication involves coercion, duress, fraud, overreaching, intimidation, undue influence, or harassment;

(2) the communication contains information prohibited by Rule 7.02 or fails to satisfy each of the requirements of Rule 7.04(a) through (c), and (g) through (q) that would be applicable to the communication if it were an advertisement in the public media; or

(3) the communication contains a false, fraudulent, misleading, deceptive, or unfair statement or claim.

(b) Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this Rule, a written, electronic, or digital solicitation communication to prospective clients for the purpose of obtaining professional employment:

(1) shall, in the case of a non-electronically transmitted written communication, be plainly marked “ADVERTISEMENT” on its first page, and on the face of the envelope or other packaging used to transmit the communication. If the written communication is in the form of a self-mailing brochure or pamphlet, the word “ADVERTISEMENT” shall be:

(i) in a color that contrasts sharply with the background color; and

(ii) in a size of at least 3/8" vertically or three times the vertical height of the letters used in the body of such communication, whichever is larger;

(2) shall, in the case of an electronic mail message, be plainly marked “ADVERTISEMENT” in the subject portion of the electronic mail and at the beginning of the message’s text;

(3) shall not be made to resemble legal pleadings or other legal documents;

(4) shall not reveal on the envelope or other packaging or electronic mail subject line used to transmit the communication, or on the outside of a self-mailing brochure or pamphlet, the nature of the legal problem of the prospective client or non-client; and

(5) shall disclose how the lawyer obtained the information prompting the communication to solicit professional employment if such contact was prompted by a specific occurrence involving the recipient of the communication or a family member of such person(s).

(c) Except as provided in paragraph (f) of this Rule, an audio, audio-visual, digital media, recorded telephone message, or other electronic communication sent to prospective clients for the purpose of obtaining professional employment:

(1) shall, in the case of any such communication delivered to the recipient by non-electronic means, plainly and conspicuously state in writing on the outside of any envelope or other packaging used to transmit the communication, that it is an “ADVERTISEMENT”;

(2) shall not reveal on any such envelope or other packaging the nature of the legal problem of the prospective client or non-client;

(3) shall disclose, either in the communication itself or in accompanying transmittal message, how the lawyer obtained the information prompting such audio, audiovisual, digital media, recorded telephone message, or other electronic communication to solicit professional employment, if such contact was prompted by a specific occurrence involving the recipient of the communication or a family member of such person(s);

(4) shall, in the case of a recorded audio presentation or a recorded telephone message, plainly state that it is an advertisement prior to any other words being spoken and again at the presentation’s or message’s conclusion; and

(5) shall, in the case of an audio-visual or digital media presentation, plainly state that the presentation is an advertisement:

(i) both verbally and in writing at the outset of the presentation and again at its conclusion; and

(ii) in writing during any portion of the presentation that explains how to contact a lawyer or law firm.

(d) All written, audio, audio-visual, digital media, recorded telephone message, or other electronic communications made to a prospective client for the purpose of obtaining professional employment of a lawyer or law firm must be reviewed and either signed by or approved in writing by the lawyer or a lawyer in the firm.

(e) A copy of each written, audio, audio-visual, digital media, recorded telephone message, or other electronic solicitation communication, the relevant approval thereof, and a record of the date of each such communication; the name, address, telephone number, or electronic address to which each such communication was sent; and the means by which each such communication was sent shall be kept by the lawyer or firm for four years after its dissemination.

(f) The provisions of paragraphs (b) and (c) of this Rule do not apply to a written, audio, audiovisual, digital media, recorded telephone message, or other form of electronic solicitation communication:

(1) directed to a family member or a person with whom the lawyer had or has an attorney client relationship;

(2) that is not motivated by or concerned with a particular past occurrence or event or a particular series of past occurrences or events, and also is not motivated by or concerned with the prospective client’s specific existing legal problem of which the lawyer is aware;

(3) if the lawyer’s use of the communication to secure professional employment was not significantly motivated by a desire for, or by the possibility of obtaining, pecuniary gain; or

(4) that is requested by the prospective client.

Comment:

1. Rule 7.03 deals with in-person telephone, and other prohibited electronic contact between a lawyer and a prospective client wherein the lawyer seeks professional employment. Rule 7.04 deals with advertisements in the public media by a lawyer seeking professional employment. This Rule deals with solicitations between a lawyer and a prospective client. Typical examples are letters or other forms of correspondence (including those sent, delivered, or transmitted electronically), recorded telephone messages audiotapes, videotapes, digital media, and the like, addressed to a prospective client.

2. Written, audio, audio-visual, and other forms of electronic solicitations raise more concerns than do comparable advertisements. Being private, they are more difficult to monitor, and for that reason paragraph (e) requires retention for four years of certain information regarding all such solicitations. See also Rule 7.07(a). Paragraph (a) addresses such concerns as well as problems stemming from exceptionally outrageous communications such as solicitations involving fraud, intimidation, or deceptive and misleading claims. Because receipt of multiple solicitations appears to be most pronounced and vexatious in situations involving accident victims, paragraphs (b)(1), (b)(2), (c)(1), (c)(4) and (c)(5) require that the envelope or other packaging used to transmit the communication, as well as the communication itself, plainly disclose that the communication is an advertisement, while paragraphs (b)(5) and (c)(3) require disclosure of the source of information if the solicitation was prompted by a specific occurrence.

3. Because experience has shown that many written, audio, audio-visual, electronic mail, and other forms of electronic solicitations have been intrusive or misleading by reason of being personalized or being disguised as some form of official communication, special prohibitions against such practices are necessary. The requirements of paragraph (b) and (c) greatly lessen those dangers of deception and harassment.

4. Newsletters or other works published by a lawyer that are not circulated for the purpose of obtaining professional employment are not within the ambit of paragraph (b) or (c).

5. This Rule also regulates audio, audio-visual or other forms of electronic communications used to solicit business. It includes such formats as recorded telephone messages, movies, audio or audio-visual recordings or tapes, digital media, the internet and other comparable forms of electronic communications. It requires that such communications comply with all of the substantive requirements applicable to written solicitations that are compatible with the different forms of media involved, as well as with all requirements related to approval of the communications and retention of records concerning them. See paragraphs (c), (d), and (e).

6. In addition to addressing these special problems posed by solicitations, Rule 7.05 regulates the content of those communications. It does so by incorporating the standards of Rule 7.02 and those of Rule 7.04 that would apply to the solicitation were it instead a comparable form of advertisement in the public media. See paragraphs (a)(2) and (3). In brief, this approach means that, except as provided in paragraph (f), a lawyer may not include or omit anything from a solicitation unless the lawyer could do so were the communication a comparable form of advertisement in the public media.

7. Paragraph (f) provides that the restrictions in paragraph (b) and (c) do not apply in certain situations because the dangers of deception, harassment, vexation and overreaching are quite low. For example, a written solicitation may be directed to a family member or a present or a former client, or in response to a request by a prospective client without stating that it is an advertisement. Similarly, a written solicitation may be used in seeking general employment in commercial matters from a bank or other corporation, when there is neither concern with specific existing legal problems nor concern with a particular past event or series of events. All such communications, however, remain subject to Rule 7.02 and paragraphs (h) through (o) of Rule 7.04. See sub-paragraph (a)(2).

8. In addition, paragraph (f) allows such communications in situations not involving the lawyer’s pecuniary gain. For purposes of these rules, it is presumed that communications made on behalf of a nonprofit legal aid agency, union, or other qualified nonprofit organization are not motivated by a desire for, or by the possibility of obtaining, pecuniary gain, but that presumption may be rebutted.

 

7.07 Filling Requirements for Public Advertisements and Written, Recorded, Electronic, or Other Digital Solicitations

(a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (e) of this Rule, a lawyer shall file with the Advertising Review Committee of the State Bar of Texas, no later than the mailing or sending by any means, including electronic, of a written, audio, audio-visual, digital or other electronic solicitation communication:

(1) a copy of the written, audio, audio-visual, digital, or other electronic solicitation communication being sent or to be sent to one or more prospective clients for the purpose of obtaining professional employment, together with a representative sample of the envelopes or other packaging in which the communications are enclosed;

(2) a completed lawyer advertising and solicitation communication application; and

(3) a check or money order payable to the State Bar of Texas for the fee set by the Board of Directors. Such fee shall be for the sole purpose of defraying the expense of enforcing the rules related to such solicitations.

(b) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this Rule, a lawyer shall file with the Advertising Review Committee of the State Bar of Texas, no later than the first dissemination of an advertisement in the public media, a copy of each of the lawyer's advertisements in the public media. The filing shall include:

(1) a copy of the advertisement in the form in which it appears or will appear upon dissemination, such as a videotape, audiotape, DVD, CD, a print copy, or a photograph of outdoor advertising;

(2) a production script of the advertisement setting forth all words used and describing in detail the actions, events, scenes, and background sounds used in such advertisement together with a listing of the names and addresses of persons portrayed or heard to speak, if the advertisement is in or will be in a form in which the advertised message is not fully revealed by a print copy or photograph;

(3) a statement of when and where the advertisement has been, is, or will be used;

(4) a completed lawyer advertising and solicitation communication application form; and

(5) a check or money order payable to the State Bar of Texas for the fee set by the Board of Directors. Such fee shall be for the sole purpose of defraying the expense of enforcing the rules related to such advertisements.

(c) Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this Rule, a lawyer shall file with the Advertising Review Committee of the State Bar of Texas no later than its first posting on the internet or other comparable network of computers information concerning the lawyer's or lawyer's firm's website. As used in this Rule, a "website" means a single or multiple page file, posted on a computer server, which describes a lawyer or law firm's practice or qualifications, to which public access is provided through publication of a uniform resource locator (URL). The filing shall include:

(1) the intended initial access page of a website;

(2) a completed lawyer advertising and solicitation communication application form and;

(3) a check or money order payable to the State Bar of Texas for the fee set by the Board of Directors. Such fee shall be for the sole purpose of defraying the expense of enforcing the rules related to such websites.

(d) A lawyer who desires to secure an advance advisory opinion, referred to as a request for pre-approval, concerning compliance of a contemplated solicitation communication or advertisement may submit to the Lawyer Advertising Review Committee, not less than thirty (30) days prior to the date of first dissemination, the material specified in paragraph (a) or (b) or the intended initial access page submitted pursuant to paragraph (c), including the application form and required fee; provided however, it shall not be necessary to submit a videotape or DVD if the videotape or DVD has not then been prepared and the production script submitted reflects in detail and accurately the actions, events, scenes, and background sounds that will be depicted or contained on such videotapes or DVDs, when prepared, as well as the narrative transcript of the verbal and printed portions of such advertisement. If a lawyer submits an advertisement or solicitation communication for pre-approval, a finding of noncompliance by the Advertising Review Committee is not binding in a disciplinary proceeding or disciplinary action, but a finding of compliance is binding in favor of the submitting lawyer as to all materials actually submitted for pre-approval if the representations, statements, materials, facts, and written assurances received in connection therewith are true and are not misleading. The finding of compliance constitutes admissible evidence if offered by a party.

(e) The filing requirements of paragraphs (a), (b), and (c) do not extend to any of the following materials, provided those materials comply with Rule 7.02(a) through (c) and, where applicable, Rule 7.04(a) through (c):

(1) an advertisement in the public media that contains only part or all of the following information,

(i) the name of the lawyer or firm and lawyers associated with the firm, with office addresses, electronic addresses, telephone numbers, office and telephone service hours, telecopier numbers, and a designation of the profession such as "attorney," "lawyer," "law office," or "firm";

(ii) the particular areas of law in which the lawyer or firm specializes or possesses special competence;

(iii) the particular areas of law in which the lawyer or firm practices or concentrates or to which it limits its practice;

(iv) the date of admission of the lawyer or lawyers to the State Bar of Texas, to particular federal courts, and to the bars of other jurisdictions;

(v) technical and professional licenses granted by this state and other recognized licensing authorities;

(vi) foreign language ability;

(vii) fields of law in which one or more lawyers are certified or designated, provided the statement of this information is in compliance with Rule 7.02(a) through (c);

(viii) identification of prepaid or group legal service plans in which the lawyer participates;

(ix) the acceptance or nonacceptance of credit cards;

(x) any fee for initial consultation and fee schedule;

(xi) other publicly available information concerning legal issues, not prepared or paid for by the firm or any of its lawyers, such as news articles, legal articles, editorial opinions, or other legal developments or events, such as proposed or enacted rules, regulations, or legislation;

(xii) in the case of a website, links to other websites;

(xiii) that the lawyer or firm is a sponsor of a charitable, civic, or community program or event, or is a sponsor of a public service announcement;

(xiv) any disclosure or statement required by these rules; and

(xv) any other information specified from time to time in orders promulgated by the Supreme Court of Texas;

(2) an advertisement in the public media that:

(i) identifies one or more lawyers or a firm as a contributor to a specified charity or as a sponsor of a specified charitable, community, or public interest program, activity, or event; and

(ii) contains no information about the lawyers or firm other than names of the lawyers or firm or both, location of the law offices, and the fact of the sponsorship or contribution;

(3) a listing or entry in a regularly published law list;

(4) an announcement card stating new or changed associations, new offices, or similar changes relating to a lawyer or firm, or a tombstone professional card;

(5) in the case of communications sent, delivered, or transmitted to, rather than accessed by, intended recipients, a newsletter, whether written, digital, or electronic, provided that it is sent, delivered, or transmitted mailed only to:

(i) existing or former clients;

(ii) other lawyers or professionals; or

(iii) members of a nonprofit organization that meets the following conditions: the primary purposes of the organization do not include the rendition of legal services; the recommending, furnishing, paying for, or educating persons regarding legal services is incidental and reasonably related to the primary purposes of the organization; the organization does not derive a financial benefit from the rendition of legal services by a lawyer; and the person for whom the legal services are rendered, and not the organization, is recognized as the client of the lawyer who is recommended, furnished, or paid by the organization;

(6) a solicitation communication that is not motivated by or concerned with a particular past occurrence or event or a particular series of past occurrences or events, and also is not motivated by or concerned with the prospective client's specific existing legal problem of which the lawyer is aware;

(7) a solicitation communication if the lawyer's use of the communication to secure professional employment was not significantly motivated by a desire for, or by the possibility of obtaining, pecuniary gain; or

(8) a solicitation communication that is requested by the prospective client.

(f) If requested by the Advertising Review Committee, a lawyer shall promptly submit information to substantiate statements or representations made or implied in any advertisement in the public media and/or written solicitation communication by which the lawyer seeks paid professional employment.

Comment:

1. Rule 7.07 covers the filing requirements for public media advertisements (see Rule 7.04) and written, recorded, or other electronic solicitations (see Rule 7.05). Rule 7.07(a) deals with solicitation communications sent by a lawyer to one or more specified prospective clients. Rule 7.07(b) deals with advertisements in the public media. Rule 7.07(c) deals with websites. Although websites are a form of advertisement in the public media, they require different treatment in some respects and so are dealt with separately. Each provision allows the Bar to charge a fee for reviewing submitted materials, but requires that fee be set solely to defray the expenses of enforcing those provisions.

2. Copies of non-exempt solicitations communications or advertisements in the public media (including websites) must be provided to the Advertising Review Committee of the State Bar of Texas either in advance or concurrently with dissemination, together with the fee required by the State Bar of Texas Board of Directors. Presumably, the Advertising Review Committee will report to the appropriate grievance committee any lawyer whom it finds from the reviewed products has disseminated an advertisement in the public media or solicitation communication that violates Rules 7.02, 7.03, 7.04, or 7.05, or, at a minimum, any lawyer whose violation raises a substantial question as to that lawyer's honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects. See Rule 8.03(a).

3. Paragraph (a) does not require that a lawyer submit a copy of each and every written solicitation letter a lawyer sends. If the same form letter is sent to several people, only a representative sample of each form letter, along with a representative sample of the envelopes used to mail the letters, need be filed.

4. A lawyer wishing to do so may secure an advisory opinion from the Advertising Review Committee concerning any proposed advertisement in the public media (including a website) or any solicitation communication in advance of its first use or dissemination by complying with Rule 7.07(d). This procedure is intended as a service to those lawyers who want to resolve any possible doubts about their proposed advertisements' or solicitations' compliance with these Rules before utilizing them. Its use is purely optional. No lawyer is required to obtain advance clearance of any advertisement in the public media (including a website) or any solicitation communication from the State Bar. Although a finding of noncompliance by the Advertising Review Committee is not binding in a disciplinary proceeding, a finding of compliance is binding in favor of the submitting lawyer as to all materials actually submitted for review, as long as the lawyer's presentation to the Advertising Review Committee in connection with that advisory opinion is true and not misleading.

5. Under its Internal Rules and Operating Procedures, the Advertising Review Committee is to complete its evaluations no later than 25 days after the date of receipt of a filing. The only way that the Committee can extend that review period is to: (1) determine that there is reasonable doubt whether the advertisement or solicitation communication complies with these Rules; (2) conclude that further examination is warranted but cannot be completed within the 25 day period; and (3) advise the lawyer of those determinations in writing within that 25 day period. The Committee's Internal Rules and Operating Procedures also provide that a failure to send such a communication to the lawyer within the 25 day period constitutes approval of the advertisement or solicitation communication. Consequently, if an attorney submits an advertisement in the public media (including a website) or a solicitation communication to the Committee for advance approval not less than 30 days prior to the date of first dissemination as required by these Rules, the attorney will receive an assessment of that advertisement or communication before the date of its first intended use.

6. Consistent with the effort to protect the first amendment rights of lawyers while ensuring the right of the public to be free from misleading advertising and the right of the Texas legal profession to maintain its integrity, paragraph (e) exempts certain types of advertisements and solicitation communications prepared for the purpose of seeking paid professional employment from the filing requirements of paragraphs (a), (b) and (c). Those types of communications need not be filed at all if they were not prepared to secure paid professional employment.

7. For the most part, the types of exempted advertising listed in sub-paragraphs (e)(1)-(5) are objective and less likely to result in false, misleading or fraudulent content. Similarly the types of exempted solicitation communications listed in sub-paragraphs (e)(6)-(8) are those found least likely to result in harm to the public. See Rule 7.05(f), and comment 7 to Rule 7.05. The fact that a particular advertisement or solicitation made by a lawyer is exempted from the filing requirements of this Rule does not exempt a lawyer from the other applicable obligations of these Rules. See generally Rules 7.01 through 7.06.

8. Paragraph (f) does not empower the Advertising Review Committee to seek information from a lawyer to substantiate statements or representations made or implied in advertisements or written communications that do not seek to obtain paid professional employment for that lawyer.