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Florida Criminal and Traffic Leads and Direct Mail

For information on Florida Civil Traffic Infractions, please click here

The leads: We collect Florida criminal and traffic cases from the following counties. If you see a county below, we collect leads for criminal and traffic cases for that county. And if you don't see a county below, we don't collect leads for it at the moment, but that may change, so feel free to check back in the future.

Alachua Bradford Brevard Broward
Charlotte Citrus Collier Columbia
DeSoto Duval Flagler Hamilton
Hendry Highlands Hillsborough Indian River
Lake Lee Manatee Marion
Martin Miami-Dade Monroe Nassau
Okaloosa Orange Osceola Palm Beach
Pasco Pinellas Polk Putnam
Santa Rosa Seminole St. Johns St. Lucie
Suwannee Volusia
Walton  

Where do you collect the data from? It depends on the county. In some counties we collect it from the clerk of court. In other counties, we collect it from the local jail/sheriff’s office. In some counties, we use a combination of clerk of court data and local jail/sheriff office data.

Types of service: We have two types of service: the Traditional Service and the Full Service. With the Traditional Service, we collect leads on new Florida criminal cases. We filter these leads according to your specifications in terms of the counties you are interested in, the types of charges (cases) you are interested in, and your general marketing strategy. We can then send you a spreadsheet containing these leads. You only pay for the leads we send you and we only send you the leads that you want. In addition, we also offer a free mail merge service. If you email us your letters, we will keep them on file, and then each day, Monday through Friday, we will mail merge the leads into your letters and then email you the already mail merged letters ready for printing. We can also perform free mail merge into labels. Just email us the brand name and number of labels that you use and then we can set up a label template. Each day, Monday through Friday, we will mail merge the leads into the labels, and email you the mail-merged labels, which will be ready for you to print at your office.

For the Full Service, we handle the entire process for you, from collecting the new Florida arrest leads, filtering them to your specifications in terms of counties, types of charges that you are interested in, and any other strategy that you have. We then print your envelopes and letters in full color and mail off your mail pieces (advertisements). We mail each day, Monday through Friday. We are professional mailers and maintain multiple permits with USPS.

Pricing: The pricing is county dependent . Each county in Florida works slightly differently in terms of how easy and how costly it is for us to get the raw data that we transform into the leads. You can either contact us for quotes for the counties you are interested in or you can click on the individual county pages to see the pricing for that county. 

Please call us at 1-888-513-6245 or email us at info@directlegalmail.com and we can talk about what you are looking for and we can provide you with a custom quote. If you have several strategies that you want to price out, we can assist you with that. We can run the volume numbers and give you average cost figures for the different strategies you have in mind. 

How fresh are the Florida leads: We collect the Florida leads each day, every day, so the leads are as fresh as the leads can be. We email the leads to you each day, Monday through Friday. Monday's data contains the leads from the weekend.

How do we prepare the data: We collect the data using either an automated program or by human data collectors. We then email the data to you Monday through Friday. Monday’s data will include data from the weekend.

Can I get only the types of cases I want and only in the counties that I want? Yes. We can filter the data to your specifications according to county and type of cases.

Can you help me execute complex marketing strategies? Yes, we can help you with just about any strategy, including, but not limited to:

  • Identifying out-of-state defendants so that you can target those most likely to hire an attorney instead of going to court themselves.
  • Identifying Hispanic records so that you can send an advertisement in Spanish.
  • Mailing for complex combinations of charges: like only mailing for driving on a suspended license if the defendant is also charged with either a DUI or a reckless driving charge.

Is it easy to make changes? Yes, just email us and ask and we can make the changes for you.

Any other special characteristics of your service: Yes, we can provide free mail merge to make things easier on your end. Basically, you email us your letters and we keep them on file. Each day, we mail merge the data into the letters, and then email you the already mail-merged letters along with the data. You can just open up the document containing the mail-merged letters and hit “print.” Then you can do the rest of the mailing process. It is that easy. There is no extra charge for mail merge.

Can you do the mailings for me? Yes. This is called our Full Service. We are able to collect the leads, filter them to your specifications, and do the mailings for you. We are professional mailers who have permits with the Post Office. We do the mailings each day, Monday through Friday, so that your potential clients promptly receive your direct mail advertisements. Please call us at 1-888-513-6245 or email us at info@directlegalmail.com so we can discuss your needs/requirements. We can also provide you with a custom quote. 

Do you have any samples of the Florida leads or sample Florida advertisement letters and mail pieces for me to look at?  Yes, please email us at info@directlegalmail.com or use the contact box to the right, and we will send you a sample of the data and/or sample letters.

Summary of Ethics Requirement

[Note: the below information is not to be considered legal advice but is guidance to assist lawyers in locating the relevant ethics rules that apply to direct mail advertising]. We have created a separate Florida ethics page that provides a copy of the relevant Florida rules that apply to direct mail advertising. Below is a brief ethics checklist: 

Direct Legal Mail's Ethics Checklist - Florida

Below is the checklist that we use when we try to help with making sure that our Florida clients' mail pieces are in compliance with Florida ethics rules. (Source: https://www.floridabar.org/ethics/etad/checklist-direct-mail/)

  • Does the advertisement fail to contain the name of at least one lawyer, the law firm or qualifying provider (lawyer referral service, matching service, group or pooled advertising program, directory, or tips or leads generator) responsible for the advertisement? Is the name illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rules 4-7.12(a)(1) and Rule 4-7.12(d)
  • Does the advertisement fail to disclose the city, town or county of at least one bona fide office location of the advertising lawyer? Is the geographic disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rules 4-7.12(a)(2) and 4-7.12(d)
  • Does the advertisement fail to disclose that the case or matter will be referred to another lawyer or law firm if that is the case? Rule 4-7.12(b) Is this disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the advertisement appears in a language other than English, does the disclosure fail to appear in that language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the advertisement contain any aspect that is misleading or deceptive? Rule 4-7.13(a)
  • Does the advertisement contain any material statements that are factually or legally inaccurate? Rule 4-7.13(a)(1)
  • Does the advertisement omit any information necessary to prevent it from misleading consumers? Rule 4-7.13(a)(2)
  • Does the advertisement contain any information that can reasonably be interpreted as a prediction or guaranty of success or specific results? Rule 4-7.13(b)(1)
  • Does the advertisement contain any references to past results that are not objectively verifiable, that omit material information or that are “literally accurate, but could reasonably mislead a prospective client regarding a material fact?” Rules 4-7.13(a)(2) and (b)(2) and Rules 4-7.14(a)(2)
  • Does the advertisement contain any statements that compare or characterize the lawyer or law firm’s skills, experience, reputation or record that are not objectively verifiable? Rule 4- 7.13(b)(3)
  • Does the lawyer advertise for legal employment in an area of practice in which the lawyer does not currently practice? Rule 4-7.13(b)(4)
  • Does the advertisement include the voice or image of a person appearing to be a member or employee of the law firm, if the person is not, without a prominent disclaimer “Not an employee or member of law firm”? Rule 4-7.13(b)(5) Is the disclosure illegible? or not reasonably prominent Rule 4-7.12(d) Does the disclosure fail to appear in the same language used in the advertisement? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the advertisement include a dramatization of a real or fictitious event without the prominent disclaimer “DRAMATIZATION. NOT AN ACTUAL EVENT.”? Rule 4- 7.13(b)(6) Is the disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) Does the disclosure fail to appear in the same language used in the advertisement? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the advertisement include an actor portraying a person in a specific profession or occupation without the prominent disclaimer “ACTOR. NOT ACTUAL [profession or occupation.]”? Rule 4-7.13(b)(6) Is the disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) Does the disclosure fail to appear in the same language used in the advertisement? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the advertisement include any feature that states or implies that the lawyer will engage in conduct or tactics prohibited by law, court rule, or the Rules of Professional Conduct? Rule 4-7.13(b)(7)
  • Does the advertisement contain any testimonials or endorsements that the person offering the testimonial is not qualified to make, that is not the actual experience of the person, that the person has received something of value for giving, that is not representative of the general experience of that lawyer or firm’s clients, that the lawyer has written or drafted, or that does not include a disclaimer that prospective clients may not receive the same or similar results? Rule 4-7.13(b)(8) Is the disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) Does the disclosure fail to appear in the same language used in the testimonial? Rule 4- 7.12(c)
  • Does the advertisement state or imply that the advertisement, the advertising lawyer, or the advertising qualifying provider (lawyer referral service, matching service, group or pooled advertising program, directory, or tips or leads generator) is approved by The Florida Bar? Rule 4-7.13(b)(9)
  • Does the advertisement include the name of a former judge preceded by the title judge (e.g., Judge Smith, retired)? Rule 4-7.13(b)(10)
  • Does the advertisement include the name of a former executive official preceded by the executive title (e.g., Governor Smith, former)? Rule 4-7.13(b)(10)
  • Does the advertisement include the name of a former legislator preceded by the legislative title (e.g., Sen. Smith, 2008-2012)? Rule 4-7.13(b)(10)
  • Does the advertisement include any reference to membership or recognition by an entity that is not generally recognized within the legal professional as a bona fide organization that bases selection on objective and uniformly applied criteria? Rule 4-7.14(a)(3)
  • Only lawyers who are board certified in a particular area of the law can claim to be certified or board certified. Lawyers who are board certified can make that claim only in the area(s) of law in which they are certified. A law firm cannot claim certification. A board-certified lawyer must include the certifying organization and area of certification in an advertisement in which the lawyer is claiming certification. A lawyer may claim specialization, expertise, or other variations of those terms only if the lawyer can objectively verify the claim either by board certification or by the lawyer’s education, training, experience, or substantial involvement in the area of practice for which the claim is made. A law firm may claim specialization, expertise, or other variations of those terms only if the law firm can objectively verify that claim for at least 1 lawyer in the firm; if not all lawyers in the firm meet that criteria, the advertisement must contain a reasonably prominent disclaimer that not all lawyers in the firm specialize or have expertise in that area.
    • Does the advertising lawyer who is not board certified claim certification in an area of law? Rule 4-7.14(a)(4)
    • Does the advertising lawyer who is board certified claim a certification in an area of law other than that in which he or she is board certified? Rules 4-7.14(a)(4) and 6- 3.9(a)
    • Does the advertising law firm claim a certification? Rules 6-3.4(c), 6-3.9(b), and 4- 7.14(a)(4)
    • Does the advertisement fail to include the name of the certifying organization and area of certification? Rule 4-7.14(a)(4)
    • Does the advertisement include a claim of specialization, expertise, or variations of those terms that cannot be objectively verified?
  • If the advertisement quotes a fee, does it fail to disclose whether the client will be responsible for any costs or expenses in addition to the advertised fee? Rule 4-7.14(a)(5) Is the cost disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the advertisement appears in a language other than English, does the cost disclosure fail to appear in that language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • If the advertisement states that the lawyer will not receive a fee unless a recovery is obtained, does the advertisement fail to disclose whether or not the client will be responsible for costs or expenses in the absence of a recovery? Rule 4-7.14(a)(5) Is the cost disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the information about fees appears in a language other than English, does the cost disclosure fail to appear in the same language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the advertisement include any image, sound, video or dramatization that solicits legal employment by appealing to a prospective client’s emotions rather than to a rational evaluation of a lawyer’s suitability to represent the prospective client? Rule 4-7.15(a)
  • Does the advertisement use a judge or an actor portraying a judge to endorse or act as a spokesperson for the lawyer or law firm? Rule 4-7.15(b)
  • Does the advertisement use a law enforcement officer or an actor portraying a law enforcement officer to endorse or act as a spokesperson for the lawyer or law firm? Rule 4- 7.15(b)
  • Does the advertisement contain the voice or image of a celebrity? Rule 4-7.15(c)
  • Does the advertisement offer an economic incentive such as a give-away to hire the lawyer or review the advertisement? Rule 4-7.15(d)
  • Has the advertisement been paid for by another lawyer who is not in the same firm as the advertising lawyer? Rule 4-7.17(a)
  • Has the advertisement been paid for by a nonlawyer? Rule 4-7.17(c)
  • If the advertising law firm employs a fictitious or trade name, does the fictitious or trade name fail to appear on all the firm’s advertising, letterhead, business cards, office sign, pleadings, and other firm documents? Rule 4-7.21(c)
  • Does the direct mail advertisement fail to prominently mark the face of the envelope and each separate enclosure of the direct mail advertisement “Advertisement” in a color that contrasts with both the background and other text? Rule 4-7.18(b)(2)(B) Is the word “Advertisement” on the envelope and each separate enclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the direct mail advertisement appears in a language other than English, does the word “Advertisement” fail to appear in that language on the face of the envelope and each separate enclosure? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • If sent as a self-mailer, does the direct mail advertisement fail to prominently mark the address panel and the inside of the self-mailer “Advertisement” in a color that contrasts with both the background and other text? Rule 4-7.18(b)(2)(B)  Is the word “Advertisement” on the address panel and the inside of the self-mailer illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the direct mail advertisement appears in a language other than English, does the word “Advertisement” fail to appear in that language on the address panel and inside of the self-mailer? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the direct mail advertisement fail to include a written statement of the advertising lawyer or law firm’s background, training and experience? Rule 4-7.18(b)(2)(C)  Is the statement of qualifications illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the advertisement appears in a language other than English, does the statement of qualifications fail to appear in that language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the direct mail advertisement include a contract that is not marked “SAMPLE” at the top of each page in red ink in type size one size larger than the largest used in the contract and “DO NOT SIGN” in the client signature line? Rule 4-7.18(b)(2)(D) Are “SAMPLE” and “DO NOT SIGN” illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the direct mail advertisement appears in a language other than English, do the words “SAMPLE” and “DO NOT SIGN” fail to appear in that language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • If the direct mail advertisement concerns a specific matter, does it fail to include as its first sentence “If you have already retained a lawyer for this matter, please disregard this letter.” Rule 4-7.18(b)(2)(E) Is this first sentence illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4- 7.12(d) If the advertisement appears in a language other than English, does the first sentence fail to appear in that language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the direct mail advertisement or any of its enclosures appear to resemble legal documents? Rule 4-7.18(b)(2)(F)
  • If a lawyer other than the one whose name or signature appears in the direct mail advertisement will actually handle the case or matter or if the matter will be referred to a lawyer in another law firm, does the direct mail advertisement so indicate? Rule 4- 7.18(b)(2)(G) Is this disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the advertisement appears in a language other than English, does this disclosure fail to appear in that language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • If the direct mail advertisement has been prompted by a specific occurrence involving or affecting the intended recipient of the communication or a family member, does it fail to disclose how the lawyer obtained the information prompting the communication? Rule 4- 7.18(b)(2)(H) Is this disclosure illegible or not reasonably prominent? Rule 4-7.12(d) If the advertisement appears in a language other than English, does the disclosure of where the information was obtained fail to appear in that language? Rule 4-7.12(c)
  • Does the direct mail advertisement disclose the nature of the prospective client’s legal problem on the envelope (or outside if sent as a self-mailing brochure)? Rule 4-7.18(b)(2)(I)
  • If the direct mail advertisement concerns an action for personal injury or wrongful death or otherwise relates to an accident or disaster involving the intended recipient or a relative of that person, have fewer than 30 days passed since the date of the injury, death, accident or disaster? Rule 4-7.18(b)(1)(A)
  • If the direct mail advertisement concerns a request for injunction against violence and is sent to the respondent in the injunction petition, is the direct mail advertisement being sent before the respondent has been served with a notice of process in the matter? Rule 4-7.18(b)(1)(G)

Below, are some of the most relevant portions of the Florida ethics rules as pertains to direct mail advertising for Florida criminal and traffic cases. Note that this is not an exhaustive list of the rules, and when in doubt you should consult the rules as on the Florida Bar website or some other source from the Florida Bar itself.

*Source: https://www.floridabar.org/ethics/etad/checklist-direct-mail/

RULE 4-7.17 PAYMENT FOR ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION

(a) Payment by Other Lawyers. No lawyer may, directly or indirectly, pay all or a part of the cost of an advertisement by a lawyer not in the same firm. Rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(D) (regarding the division of contingency fees) is not affected by this provision even through the lawyer covered by subdivision (f)(4)(D)(ii) of rule 4-1.5 advertises.

(b) Payment for Referrals. A lawyer may not give anything of value to a person for recommending the lawyer's services, except that a lawyer may pay the reasonable cost of advertising permitted by these rules, may pay the usual charges of a lawyer referral service, lawyer directory or other legal service organization, and may purchase a law practice in accordance with rule 4-1.17.

(c) Payment by Nonlawyers. A lawyer may not permit a nonlawyer to pay all or a part of the cost of an advertisement by that lawyer.

                                                  Comment

Paying for the Advertisements of Another Lawyer

       A lawyer is not permitted to pay for the advertisements of another lawyer not in the same firm.  This rule is not intended to prohibit more than 1 law firm from advertising jointly, but the advertisement must contain all required information as to each advertising law firm.

Paying Others for Recommendations

       A lawyer is allowed to pay for advertising permitted by this rule and for the purchase of a law practice in accordance with the provisions of rule 4-1.17, but otherwise is not permitted to pay or provide other tangible benefits to another person for procuring professional work.  However, a legal aid agency or prepaid legal services plan may pay to advertise legal services provided under its auspices. Likewise, a lawyer may participate in lawyer referral programs or lawyer directories and pay the usual fees charged by such programs, subject, however to the limitations imposed by rules 4-7.22 and 4.7-23. This rule does not prohibit paying regular compensation to an assistance, such as a secretary or advertising consultant, to prepare communications premitted by this rule.

RULE 4-7.18 DIRECT CONTACT WITH PROSPECTIVE CLIENTS

(a) Solicitation. Except as provided in subdivision (b) of this rule, a lawyer may not:

        (1) solicit in person, or permit employees or agents of the lawyer to solicit in person on the lawyer's behalf, professional employment from a prospective client with whom the lawyer has no family or prior professional relationship when a significant motive for the lawyer's doing so is the lawyer's pecuniary gain.  The term "solicit" includes contact in person, by telephone, by electronic means that include real-time communication face-to-face such as video telephone or video conference, or by other communication directed to a specific recipient that does not meet the requirements of subdivision (b) of this rule and rules 4.7-11 through 4.7-17 of these rules.

        (2) enter into an agreement for, charge, or collect a fee for professional employment obtained in violation of this rule.

(b) Written Communication.

(1) A lawyer may not send, or knowingly permit to be sent, on the lawyer's behalf or on behalf of the lawyer's firm or partner, an associate, or any other lawyer affiliated with the lawyer or the lawyer's firm, a written communication directly or indirectly to a prospective client for the purpose of obtaining professional employment if:

           (A) the written communication concerns an action for personal injury or wrongful death or otherwise relates to an accident or disaster involving the person to whom the communication is addressed or a relative of that person, unless the accident or disaster occurred more than 30 days prior to the mailing of the communication;
           (B) the written communication concerns a specific matter and the lawyer knows or reasonably should know that the person to whom the communication is directed is represented by a lawyer in the matter;
           (C) it has been made known to the lawyer that the person does not want to receive such communications from the lawyer;
           (D) the communication involves coercion, duress, fraud, overreaching, harassment, intimidation, or undue influence;
           (E) the communication violates rules 4-7.11 through 4-7.17 of these rules;
           (F) the lawyer knows or reasonably should know that the physical, emotional, or mental state of the person makes it unlikely that the person would exercise reasonable judgment in employing a lawyer; or
           (G) the communication concerns a request for an injunction for protection against any form of physical violence and is addressed to the respondent in the injunction petition, if the lawyer knows or reasonably should know that the respondent named in the injunction petition has not yet been served with notice of process in the matter.

(2) Written communications to prospective clients for the purpose of obtaining professional employment that are not prohibited by subdivision (b)(1) are subject to the following requirements:

           (A) Such communications are subject to the requirements of 4-7.11 through 4-7.17 of these rules.
           (B) Each separate enclosure of the communication and the face of an envelope containing the communication must be reasonably prominently marked "advertisement" in ink that contrasts with both the background it is printed on and other text appearing on the same page. If the written communication is in the form of a self-mailing brochure or pamphlet, the "advertisement" mark must be reasonably prominently marked on the address panel of the brochure or pamphlet, on the inside of the brochure or pamphlet, and on each separate enclosure. If the written communication is sent via electronic mail, the subject line must begin with the word "Advertisement."
           (C) Every written communication must be accompanied by a written statement detailing the background, training and experience of the lawyer or law firm. This statement must include information about the specific experience of the advertising lawyer or law firm in the area or areas of law for which professional employment is sought. Every written communication disseminated by a lawyer referral service must be accompanied by a written statement detailing the background, training, and experience of each lawyer to whom the recipient may be referred.
           (D) If a contract for representation is mailed with the written communication, the top of each page of the contract must be marked "SAMPLE" in red ink in a type size one size larger than the largest type used in the contract and the words "DO NOT SIGN" must appear on the client signature line.
           (E) The first sentence of any written communication prompted by a specific occurrence involving or affecting the intended recipient of the communication or a family member must be: "If you have already retained a lawyer for this matter, please disregard this letter."
           (F) Written communications must not be made to resemble legal pleadings or other legal documents.
           (G) If a lawyer other than the lawyer whose name or signature appears on the communication will actually handle the case or matter, or if the case or matter will be referred to another lawyer or law firm, any written communication concerning a specific matter must include a statement so advising the client.
           (H) Any written communication prompted by a specific occurrence involving or affecting the intended recipient of the communication or a family member must disclose how the lawyer obtained the information prompting the communication. The disclosure required by this rule must be specific enough to enable the recipient to understand the extent of the lawyer's knowledge regarding the recipient's particular situation.
           (I) A written communication seeking employment by a specific prospective client in a specific matter must not reveal on the envelope, or on the outside of a self-mailing brochure or pamphlet, the nature of the client's legal problem.

(3) The requirements in subdivision (b)(2) of this rule do not apply to communications between lawyers, between lawyers and their own current and former clients, or between lawyers and their own family members, or to communications by the lawyer at a prospective client’s request.

Comment

Prior Professional Relationship
Persons with whom the lawyer has a prior professional relationship are exempted from the general prohibition against direct, in-person solicitation. A prior professional relationship requires that the lawyer personally had a direct and continuing relationship with the person in the lawyer's capacity as a professional. Thus, a lawyer with a continuing relationship as the patient of a doctor, for example, does not have the professional relationship contemplated by the rule because the lawyer is not involved in the relationship in the lawyer's professional capacity. Similarly, a lawyer who is a member of a charitable organization totally unrelated to the practice of law and who has a direct personal relationship with another member of that organization does not fall within the definition.
On the other hand, a lawyer who is the legal advisor to a charitable board and who has direct, continuing relationships with members of that board does have prior professional relationships with those board members as contemplated by the rule. Additionally, a lawyer who has a direct, continuing relationship with another professional where both are members of a trade organization related to both the lawyer's and the nonlawyer's practices would also fall within the definition. A lawyer's relationship with a doctor because of the doctor's role as an expert witness is another example of a prior professional relationship as provided in the rule.
A lawyer who merely shared a membership in an organization in common with another person without any direct, personal contact would not have a prior professional relationship for purposes of this rule. Similarly, a lawyer who speaks at a seminar does not develop a professional relationship within the meaning of the rule with seminar attendees merely by virtue of being a speaker.

Disclosing Where the Lawyer Obtained Information
In addition, the lawyer or law firm should reveal the source of information used to determine that the recipient has a potential legal problem. Disclosure of the information source will help the recipient to understand the extent of knowledge the lawyer or law firm has regarding the recipient's particular situation and will avoid misleading the recipient into believing that the lawyer has particularized knowledge about the recipient's matter if the lawyer does not. The lawyer or law firm must disclose sufficient information or explanation to allow the recipient to locate the information that prompted the communication from the lawyer.
Alternatively, the direct mail advertisement would comply with this rule if the advertisement discloses how much information the lawyer has about the matter.
For example, a direct mail advertisement for criminal defense matters would comply if it stated that the lawyer's only knowledge about the prospective client's matter is the client's name, contact information, date of arrest and charge. In the context of securities arbitration, a direct mail advertisement would comply with this requirement by stating, if true, that the lawyer obtained information from a list of investors, and the only information on that list is the prospective client's name, address, and the fact that the prospective client invested in a specific company.

RULE 4-7.19 EVALUATION OF ADVERTISEMENTS

(a) Filing Requirements. Subject to the exemptions stated in rule 4-7.20, any lawyer who advertises services shall file with The Florida Bar a copy of each advertisement at least 20 days prior to the lawyer's first dissemination of the advertisement. The advertisement must be filed at The Florida Bar headquarters address in Tallahassee.


(b) Evaluation by The Florida Bar. The Florida Bar will evaluate all advertisements filed with it pursuant to this rule for compliance with the applicable provisions set forth in rules 4-7.11 through 4-7.15 and 4-7.18(b)(2). If The Florida Bar does not send any communication to the filer within 15 days of receipt by The Florida Bar of a complete filing, or within 15 days of receipt by The Florida Bar of additional information when requested within the initial 15 days, the lawyer will not be subject to discipline by The Florida Bar, except if The Florida Bar subsequently notifies the lawyer of noncompliance, the lawyer may be subject to discipline for dissemination of the advertisement after the notice of noncompliance.

(c) Preliminary Opinions. A lawyer may obtain an advisory opinion concerning the compliance of a contemplated advertisement prior to production of the advertisement by submitting to The Florida Bar a draft or script that includes all spoken or printed words appearing in the advertisement, a description of any visual images to be used in the advertisement, and the fee specified in this rule. The voluntary prior submission does not satisfy the filing and evaluation requirements of these rules, but once completed, The Florida Bar will not charge an additional fee for evaluation of the completed advertisement.